16 / 02 / 17

  VoD

  UK

BBC: British Binge-watching Corporation?

This month, Merriam-Webster added “binge-watch” to its dictionary, which it defines as “to watch many or all episodes of (a TV series) in rapid succession”. In Ampere’s latest UK consumer survey, 53.9% of respondents regularly watch multiple episodes back-to-back with 16-24 and 25-34 year olds over-indexing for binge-watching. Recent developments from British public broadcaster the BBC suggest that it, too, is embracing “binge-watch” culture:


•    BBC partnered with ITV to launch SVoD service, BritBox, in the US, allowing US subscribers on-demand access to a suite of British content.

•    It intends to scrap “linear exclusivity” and release an entire series of a show on iPlayer before linear broadcast in the hope of keeping up with industry giants; Netflix and Amazon.

•    Selected TV series, including recent dramas Taboo and Apple Tree Yard will be available as box sets for 30 days from the date of the airing of the final episode. This is rather than its blanket “30 day catch-up” model on all content which meant that consumers joining a series more than a month into a show run were unable to catch up with the earliest episodes.


Although Netflix and Amazon typically launch an entire original series at once, it is not always the way. Amazon’s The Grand Tour for instance, opted instead to release episodes on a weekly basis. The BBC’s move online has also extended to turning its millennial-geared channel, BBC Three, into an online-only service. It also closed a legal loophole which allowed consumers viewing non-linear content on the iPlayer service to evade the £145.50 per year TV licence fee.  


The likelihood of a UK respondent agreeing with the statement “I frequently watch several episodes of the same TV show back-to-back” has seen minimal year-on-year change - 54.6% in Q3 2015 vs. 53.9% in Q4 2016.  However, there has been an increase in this figure among those who have used either Netflix or Amazon Instant Video in the previous month, whereas BBC has seen little year-on-year change. This suggests that this move may increase the likelihood to binge-watch for BBC iPlayer users, or encourage more of those who enjoy binge-watching to use BBC iPlayer.




15 / 02 / 17

  TVoD

  USA

How the price of Transactional Video-on-Demand (TVoD) content declines


Looking at all pricing data from a selection of large US transactional stores, Ampere has been conducting research into how price decline varies with content age. We would typically expect that, on average, the more recently a title was released, the more expensive it will be - and this does hold, but less than one might think. In the case of renting, titles settle onto a relatively constant price within five years of initial release, with the price stabilising for library content.

In the case of purchasing buying to keep, however, titles typically undergo a fall in price over the first 20 years following release, after which the price rises, settling onto a relatively constant price some 30 years after initial release. While this may seem counter-intuitive, it makes sense in the context of more niche, older content. If the cost of hosting content is minimal, and the content has reached an age at which the audience is likely to be very small, there's little value in offering discounts to try to tempt consumers.

This general trend of falling transaction price with age is observed in the case of titles released by many of the major parent distributors, as shown by a selection. It is, however, noticeable that certain studios are employing different pricing strategies, and Lionsgate titles in particular stand out as being priced at approximately two thirds of the price of those from other major studios. This is solely due to EST purchase price - prices for rental are consistent with other studios' averages - and are consistent across all major VoD platforms studied.


8 / 02 / 17

  USA, Western Europe

  Amazon, Netflix

Not the market toy manufacturers deserve, but the one it needs right now

Alongside the release of "The LEGO Batman Movie", Ampere finds that the number of LEGO-related titles licensed to major SVoD services in the UK and US has doubled in the last 18 months.

2 / 02 / 17
Video crucial component in halting decline of mobile contract value

Mobile product lines have lost substantially more value per customer than their fixed counterparts over the past decade. Operators should now be thinking about how fixed content strategies can be adapted to protect the value of mobile customers.

26 / 01 / 17

  Fixed Line Telephony, Mobile Telephony , Broadband access, Programming, Pay TV

  Switzerland, Italy, Germany, Austria, UK

  Sky

Content and OTT key to Sky's future growth

The potential combination with 21st Century Fox and content synergies were brought into sharp focus as Sky revealed its results for the six months ending December 2016.

25 / 01 / 17

  TVoD

New-title halo effect: quantifying the boost to older franchise movies

We often observe a surge in the average chart ranking of a film around the time of release of its sequel. This is, in part, due to vendors dropping the price of the original film but has much more to do with nostalgia.

19 / 01 / 17

  TVoD, OTT, VoD

  Central & Eastern Europe, North America, Western Europe

It's Official: Die Hard is a Christmas film

Ampere solves the long-running debate over whether Die Hard is really a Christmas film

9 / 01 / 17

  SVoD

  France

  Vivendi, SFR

The French VoD paradox

France Télévisions looks set to become the latest entrant to the French Subscription Video on Demand (SVoD) market with news that the broadcaster is working on launch of a new service this year. But France is a challenging market for SVoD...

3 / 01 / 17

  Content

  North America, Western Europe

  YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat

Social media video platforms driving viewing screen shift

The ascent of youth-driven social media video platforms is changing the way people engage with video with huge implications for content producers.

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